News at Medicine - January 2022 - Promising Talent


Promising Talent
January 18, 2022
More than 50 graduate students, including four from the Faculty of Medicine, are sharing more than $1.9 million in funding to support diverse research projects ranging from exploring Islamophobia to social entrepreneurship.
 
On Jan. 12, the federal government announced the latest recipients of several tri-agency scholarships and fellowships programs.
 
In the Faculty of Medicine, Talston Scott, Chelsea A. Crossley, Daphne To and Lisa Fang received graduate research funding.
 
Talston Scott received $17,500 in funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council's Canada Graduate Scholarship – Master's program funding for Commercial surrogacy in Canada: Exploring themes and factors surrounding the rise of cross-border reproductive care and international surrogacy.
 
Chelsea A. Crossley received $17,500 in funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research's Canada Graduate Scholarships for Investigation of the Influence of Pretangle Tau on Cellular Properties in Different Brain Regions involved in Alzheimer’s disease.
 
Daphne To received $17,500 in funding from CIHR's Canada Graduate Scholarships – Masters Awards and $6,000 from CIHR's Canada Graduate Scholarships – Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplements for Evaluation of strategies to enhance intervention fidelity of a multi-component intervention to reduce non-indicated imaging for low back pain.
 
Lisa Fang received $6,000 in funding from CIHR's Canada Graduate Scholarships – Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplements for Identification of neural circuits underlying obesity.
 
Graduate students based in the faculties of Business Administration, Humanities and Social Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Education and Science, and the schools of Music, Social Work, Science and the Environment, Fisheries and Fine Arts are also among those receiving support.
 
The funding comes from programs such as the Canada Graduate Scholarships – Doctoral program, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowships program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Postgraduate Scholarships – Doctoral program, the Canada Graduate Scholarships – Master’s program and others.
 

‘New generation’

 
Dr. Amy Warren, interim associate vice-president (academic) and dean of graduate studies, says the investment empowers the next generation of researchers.
 
“Federal funding for students is an integral part of graduate education,” Dr. Warren told the Gazette. “And it is of the utmost importance as we lead these emerging scholars into ground-breaking research, both in terms of the methods they will use for research as well as the research areas they will undertake.
 
“Increased funding will allow these new generations of scholars help lend their expertise to endeavours that will no doubt change the world we live in for the better.”
 
Information supplied by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the School of Graduate Studies.
 
To read the full list of Memorial University award recipients, please read the story at The Gazette.