News at Medicine - December 2018 - Dr. Bruce Sells


Dr. Bruce Sells
December 14, 2018
Dr. Bruce Sells arrived at Memorial’s Faculty of Medicine just as the first class of MD students were graduating. In 1972, Dr. Sells after 10 years at St. Jude Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee he moved his complete laboratory of 18 research associates to Newfoundland.
 

Born in Gatineau Mills, Quebec in 1930, Dr. Sells passed away at the age of 88, at the Brockville General Hospital on November 10, 2018.

When he arrived at Memorial, Dr. Sells began a research project to investigate factors which control the process of growth. The study was awarded $62,500 from the Medical Research Council of Canada.
He remained here for a few years, as professor of molecular biology and serving as associate dean of Basic Medical Sciences from 1979-1983. He established the Dr. Bruce and Bernice Sells Award in Medicine and Music a few months ago and it will soon be awarded for the first time. 
 
He left Memorial University in 1983 to become dean of Biological Sciences at Guelph University until 1995.
 
 A molecular biologist for 40 years, whose career took him and his family to many cities around the world, resulting in children born in four different countries.
 
Dr. Sells began with postdoctoral work in Belgium and Denmark. He became a leading researcher on Ribosomes. In 1972, after retirement from Guelph, he spent ten years as executive director at Canadian Federation of Biological Societies. During his career he was appointed member of the Medical Research Council, served on a number of the MRC (now CIHR) Grant panels, as well as, committees of the National Cancer institute and the Arthritis Society.
 
He received numerous fellowships and was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1983. He had hundreds of publications and helped guide 50 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows over the years. Dr. Sells lived in Perth, Ontario after retirement.


His obituary states that ‘He will be remembered by many, not just for his academic accomplishments, but his sincerity, his compassion and his ridiculous jokes.’