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Health Research Repository

Frequently Asked Questions

1.  What is Open Access?
2.  What is the Health Research Repository?
3.  Why should I deposit my work in the Health Research Repository?
4.  Should I deposit work I've already published in the repository?
5.  What are pre-prints and post-prints?
6.  Is it easy to deposit my work?
7.  What happens if I leave Memorial?
8.  Can I withdraw my work after depositing it?
9.  What if I revise a paper?  Can I add the new version, or replace the old one?
10.  Who has copyright of my work after it's submitted?

11.  What is a Creative Commons Licence?
12.  What is a DOI?
13.  How do I find the Reference URL for my work in the Health Research Repository?
14.  What exactly are the CIHR and NIH requirements?
15.  The Association of American Publishers has claimed that the NIH policy violates copyright law.  Is this true?
16.  What other granting agencies are instituting Open Access policies?
17.  What is an Institutional Repository?




1.  What is Open Access?
Open Access is a scholarly publishing philosophy that is the result of international collaboration and cooperation amongst a variety of stakeholders. Three public statements referred to as the Budapest, Bethesda, and Berlin statements provide the most comprehensive definition of Open Access.  

According to the Budapest Open Access Initiative:
"By 'open access' to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited."

Peter Suber also provides brief and detailed overviews of Open Access through Open Access News.

2.  What is the Health Research Repository?
The Health Research Repository is a new library service that aims to assist Memorial University researchers with disseminating their work.   This repository will provide Memorial researchers with a means for meeting the Open Access funding requirements recently instituted by the CIHR and NIH.  The collection will be located within the Digital Archive Initiative

3.  Why should I deposit my work in Memorial's institutional repository?
The Health Research Repository offers a number of benefits to researchers:
  • Open Access has been proven to foster scholarly communication and increase impact.  Click here for a selected list of studies on the link between Open Access and research impact (thanks to UBC's cIRcle)
  • Each work in the repository gets a permanent "reference URL" that preserves access to your work.  The link can then be added to your CV, personal website, departmental website, Facebook account or forwarded to multiple recipients through email.  Access will remain stable over time.
  • The Digital Archives Initiative and Library will establish standard metadata and descriptors for your work to make it more accessible
  • Search engines like Google and Yahoo give priority to materials harvested from Institutional Repositories, increasing visibility
  • You will not need to do any technical troubleshooting and/or software maintenance.  The Digital Archives Initiative is committed to maintaining access and to upkeep of the server, including backups and regular servicing
  • Materials submitted will be identified as being a part of Memorial's scholarly output, raising the profile of Memorial University and its scholars
  • The repository provides a method for complying with the CIHR and NIH Open Access policies
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4.  Should I deposit work I've already published into the repository?
Many publishers recognize author's rights to post pre-prints of their work online; some also allow authors to make post-prints available online.  Elsevier, Springer and many society publishers are among them. Check the SHERPA/RoMEO database of publisher's agreements - you may already have permission to post your work without renegotiating.  You can also consult this list compiled by RoMEO identifying publishers that allow authors to post the published PDF version of their article.

5.  What are pre-prints and post-prints?
In the institutional repository context, the pre-print is the "version of the paper before peer-review," and a post-print refers to the "version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions being made," as per the definitions outlined by SHERPA.

6.  Is it easy to deposit my work?
All you need is a PDF version of your research that has the appropriate copyright clearances for submission.  This web guide to submitting your work can help.  Just follow the steps online or print it out.  If you encounter any issues, please contact us.

7.  What happens if I leave Memorial?
If authors who have submitted work to the Repository leave Memorial University, their work will be retained in the Archive.

8.  Can I withdraw work from the repository?
Once a file is submitted and available, it is available for anyone to cite and it is important not to render the citation as useless.  It is our policy to retain all works submitted. Only in exceptional cases will a work be completely removed. 

Reasons for withdrawal of content could be factual inaccuracy, copyright infringement, or plagiarism. Ordinarily, content will not be removed simply because the author has produced a revised version of a work.When content is removed, the description (metadata) for the work will remain as a placeholder, with its affiliated reference URL. A brief statement explaining the reason for withdrawal of the content will be added to the description.

No materials will be removed without the authors' knowledge.

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9.  What if I revise a paper?  Can I add the new version, or replace the old one? 
The Repository is for completed material, not for works in progress.  If you revise a paper you've deposited, or wish to add an addendum, submit the new material and check that it is a revised version.  We can add a revised version to the existing deposit.

10.  Who has copyright of my work after it's submitted?
You retain all intellectual rights, including copyright, to your material.

Memorial uses the Creative Commons Licence for previously unpublished works that are deposited, which provides an explicit mechanism for others to know how you want your material to be used.

If your work has previously been published, you may no longer hold the copyright to your work, and may therefore have limited options as to the electronic distribution of that work.  Because publisher's policies differ, check the SHERPA/RoMEO database of publishers to review your agreements.

11.  What is a Creative Commons Licence?
Creative Commons is a group that has defined alternative licences whereby you can release some of the rights you are automatically assigned by copyright law.  Click here for the Canadian Creative Commons website.

We use the "Attribution - Non-Commercial - No-Derivative 2.5 Canada" licence.  This licence permits a user of the work to share the work, so long as they attribute the work to the author, do not use it for commercial purposes, and are not modifying it in any way.

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12.  What is a DOI?
DOI stands for Digital Object Identifier. A work's DOI is permanent so that the work can always be located even if its URL changes; the user will automatically be redirected to the new URL. A DOI is assigned to an individual article, and not to the whole journal, volume, or issue. A DOI takes the format doi:10.1016/j.acra.2007.10.014, and in the electronic version of a journal, it is often found near the citation information for the article.
For example:
        Academic Radiology
        Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2008, Pages 1-2
        doi:10.1016/j.acra.2007.10.014


13.  How do I find the Reference URL for my work in the Health Research Repository? 
If you wish to revise a document currently deposited in the repository, we require the Reference URL of the current document.  

Go to the Health Research Repository link in the Digital Archives Initiative.  Locate and click on your document.  The link to the Reference URL is at the top of the page in the beige bar.  Click on the "reference URL" link and it will be displayed.  You can then copy and paste the link into the submission form.
 
14.  What exactly are the CIHR and NIH requirements?
Both the CIHR and NIH have created guides to assist with understanding and complying with their public access policies:
15. The Association of American Publishers has claimed that the NIH policy violates copyright law.  Is this true?
No.  SPARC and the Association of Research Libraries responded to these claims in this memo.

16. What other granting agencies are instituting Open Access policies?
Click here for a summary of funding agency policies on open access.

17.  What is an Institutional Repository?
"An institutional repository (IR) is a digital collection of an organization’s intellectual output. Institutional repositories centralize, preserve, and make accessible the knowledge generated by academic institutions. IRs also form part of a larger global system of repositories, which are indexed in a standardized way, and searchable using one interface, providing the foundation for a new and innovative services."  (Canadian Association of Research Libraries)

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